When you brake your motorcycle properly, it will stop safely, steadily, and predictably. Modern motorcycles come with superior front and rear brakes. Generally speaking, the front brake serves as the primary brake. Usually, it can stop the motorcycle by itself.

To achieve a controlled stop, however, it might be necessary to apply the front and rear brakes simultaneously if there is a passenger or piece of luggage on the back. Because of this, you must have confidence in your braking technique and practice it until it comes naturally to you.

Your motorcycle’s brakes

A motorcycle’s front brake serves as its primary brake. A common fear among riders is the front wheel locking up. When learning how to apply the brakes correctly, it may occur. To get the front wheel to spin again if the wheel does lock, simply slightly release the brake. You’ll have gained new knowledge and your motorcycle will stabilize.

A common fear among riders is the front wheel locking up

The locking of the rear wheels is even more dangerous than that of the front wheels. Bike sliding may occur if the rear wheel locks. It’s crucial to learn how to use the front and rear brakes simultaneously.

This ought to be your default stopping technique if your motorcycle has a front brake that can manage halting it. However, you must learn to use both brakes simultaneously if your motorbike has poor brakes or a lot of weight over the back tire (tourist bikes and motorcycles carrying passengers or luggage, for instance).

Position of the rider and the method of halting a motorcycle

Braking on a motorcycle is greatly affected by your riding position. When you brake, it’s normal to straighten your back and tense your arms, which might lead to issues. By shifting the weight up the front wheel and encouraging a lift in the rear wheel, it destabilises the motorcycle.

Rather, secure your feet with the pegs. The fuel tank should be hugged by the thighs and knees. Your body should be held back by the muscles in your legs, stomach, and lower back. Remain calm and loose with your arms. Your braking is also affected by where you glance. Maintain a steady look and focus on the distance.

Your body should be held back by the muscles in your legs, stomach, and lower back.

By placing the rider in this position, the bike’s braking inertia is fed lower and farther back, improving stability and guaranteeing that the back wheel stays in contact with the road. Additionally, it is far better for your front suspension. When you execute it correctly, your bike will halt and rise on its forks, allowing you to sit upright on it. After that, plant one foot on the ground to provide stability.

Brake pressure control system

Smoothly and rapidly applying all of your brakes will lead to effective braking. While using your front brakes, don’t be afraid to apply them forcefully. Instead, exert pressure with determination and fluidity. Spend no time indulging in meekness. When you’re riding at thirty miles per hour, your motorbike passes 13.5 metres in one second! That is around two car lengths away.

The front suspension is compressed in a regulated manner by this deliberate and fluid operation. Riding becomes safer and smoother as a result.

When the brake is applied too forcefully, the front suspension “goes down”, which increases the risk of a skid and stomp. It takes practice to have a precise feel for how swiftly and smoothly you need to perform this. It will change based on the circumstances, so be mindful and deliberate in your practice.

It takes practice to have a precise feel for how swiftly and smoothly you need to perform this.

Motorcycle brakes in the back require a little different method. In general, they’re a little harder to control. Two things control whether they lock up: how hard you brake and how much weight is transferred to the front wheel. When braking or traveling, your motorcycle is stabilized by its revolving rear wheel.

Use your front and rear brakes simultaneously. When executed properly, it maintains stability by directing inertia towards the bake and keeping it low. Depending on the weight you are carrying, the pressure will change. 

How to brake a motorcycle in a curve

It’s advisable to avoid using the rear brake when navigating a curve. There is a significant chance of sliding out. You’ll note that the motorcycle prefers to straighten up when you engage the front brake when navigating a curve. It starts to feel like it wants to drive straight and the steering gets heavy.

You have to brake and countersteer simultaneously when braking around a curve to keep your motorcycle on course. The safest and most effective method of braking in a curve is this one.

You have to brake and countersteer simultaneously when braking around a curve to keep your motorcycle on course

As you reach a slower pace, you should also release the handlebar pressure. If not, there’s a chance the bike will tumble.

Exercises for improving motorcycle braking technique

Practicing motorbike braking and stopping techniques on the road is a vastly different experience than reading about them. Here are three exercises to help you improve as a motorbike rider and hone your braking skills.

Exercise for Braking #1

Practice solely applying the front brake in all circumstances requiring a speed decrease. Move your fingers and hand towards the brake consciously. Make sure your lower body is securely fastened and embrace the bike when in the riding posture. With your gaze gazing forward, your arms should be relaxed and loose. To brake more quickly, smoothly, and safely, one must be prepared with brakes.

Use the brakes firmly and smoothly. When approaching a well-known bend, try applying the brakes a little later than normal. Gradually modify the machine, making sure you maintain control at all times. 

Exercise for Braking #2

Learn how to use the back brake. Try varying the amount of pressure required to lock the rear wheel in various circumstances. Proceed cautiously and step-by-step. Release the brake and see how it feels when the back wheel locks. This needs to be handled carefully and cautiously. 

Discover how different rear wheel locks feel on tarmac and gravel, as well as on wet and dry roads. Pay attention to your rear braking. Apply rear brake pressure mindfully until you feel comfortable and competent doing so.

Apply rear brake pressure mindfully until you feel comfortable and competent doing so

Exercise for Braking #3

Mix the brakes on the front and back. When you apply the front and rear brakes simultaneously, the rear locks earlier. Pay attention to the timing of each brake. Keep your attention primarily on the front brake. Attempt to apply the proper amount of pressure to the rear brake simultaneously with the front brake.

Generally speaking, you should only use the front brake. When the motorcycle’s front brake can stop the bike on its own, this is a safer alternative that offers you just one brake to concentrate on. Your top priority should be to figure out how to use this efficiently.

Braking conclusion 

It requires a lot of practice to ride a motorbike safely, effectively, and efficiently. You get the chance to practice this every ride, whether it’s with your motorcycle steering, acceleration, or braking. Every ride will present fresh chances to grow and learn. And if you want to learn to ride a motorcycle under the supervision of an experienced trainer, then find one easily and quickly using the best mobile application for motorcyclists and bikers, CryptoMoto!

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Alberto D. Harris
Alberto D. Harris
5 months ago

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5 months ago

Thanks!